Teen Issues – Pads, Liners, and Liners

Once you begin menstruating, you'll need to use a pad, tampon, or both. You may want to use only pads, only tampons, or both. Most girls find it useful to use pads during days of light flow, or when their period first starts. Tampons are usually used during times of heavy flow, or while swimming and other physical activities.

Liners: A thinner pad designed for days of lighter ministration.
Pad: An absorbent piece of material worn by a girl while she is menstruating, to absorb the flow of blood from the vagina.

Instructions: The following are general instructions on how to use disposable pads.

1. Remove the pad from its wrapping.

2. Remove the paper backing from the back of the pad (and wings if applicable).

3. Pull panties down to access crotch area.

4. Firmly press the pad into the crotch of your panties (middle area which Touches your vagina) quilted side up.

5. Change pads every 4-6 hours. Also change your pad if you feel leaks, or it becomes uncomfortable.

Tampons: A tampon is a disposable plug that a woman inserts into her vagina during her menstrual period to absorb the flow of blood.

Instructions: The following are general instructions on how to use disposable pads.

1. Sit or stand in a comfortable position, you can try propping your foot on the bathtub, or toilet seat. Be sure to relax, this will make insertion easier. Hold the tampon by the larger tube with the string away from your body.

2. With your other hand pull back the skin around your vagina, and position the tampon in the vaginal opening.

3. Gently push the tampon into your vagina until the outer tube is completely inside your vagina.

4. Once the outer tube is inside, use your index finger to push the inner tube through the outer tube.

5. Once the inner tube is inside, use your thumb and middle finger to remove the outer tube, leaving the string hanging outside of your vagina.
Removal: To remove the tampon site on the toilet, and gently pull the string until the tampon is out.

For more information about teen puberty, please visit http://www.myfirstbra.us .

History of the Abacus

The abacus has a very long history. It spans over thousands of years. The earliest abacus was invented about 5000 years ago. Some expert historians believe that the abacus was invented by the ancient Chinese. Still others are of the opinion that the abacus was invented by the Babylonians or by the Egyptians. However, all these claims are backed by historical evidence like archaeological excavations and ancient texts. It may be possible that many civilizations may have invented the abacus independently and roughly at the same time.

The first counting device was the human hand and the fingers. The reason why we use the decimal system is that there are 10 fingers (both hands combined) and so it is very easy to count if 10 is the base. Later on man started using natural objects and markings to count and calculate. Larger quantities [exceeding 10] could not be easily count on the fingers. So various natural objects like pebbles and twigs were used.

Merchants needed not only needed a way to count the goods that they bought and sold, they also needed a method to perform calculations. This was achieved with the help of counting boards. Until the advent of a proper number system, counting boards were very popular. The abacus has its origin in one such counting board.

Time line of the history of the abacus:

  • 3000 BC: An early form of abacus originates in the Orient
  • 1000 BC: Chinese start using counting boards
  • 500 BC: Romans and Greeks use counting boards
  • 300 BC: Abacus is widely used as a counting device in China
  • 500 AD: The abacus is used in Europe

Going Shooting? Do not Leave the House Without These 5 Gadgets

I personally do not like to drag a lot of equipment with me when I'm out shooting, but there are a few things I simply can not do without. I have listed my top 5 pieces of equipment that every photographer (amateur or not) should consider adding to their camera bag.

Epson's Multimedia Photo Viewers
These small, portable backup / storage / display devices can truly save the day if you are out shooting and find yourself with filled up memory cards and lots left to see. You can transfer photos (as well as video and music) straight from your camera or through the built in card slots. The viewers come in three different configurations: the P-3000 has a 40GB hard drive, the P-6000 80GB, and the P-7000 160GB. All measure 3.5×5.9×1.3 "and weigh 1lb, and some of the features include 4" screens, long life rechargeable batteries, and A / V output. $ 299- $ 699.

Gorilla pod
These flexible, funky looking tripods are amazing little gadgets. Sturdy and durable, their legs twist and bend so that they are able to attach to almost anything (your bike, a car, a pole, a branch, etc.). They come in 5 sizes to suit everything from cell phones to heavy video cameras, and are really lightweight: 1.6oz (the "Go-Go") to 1.1 lbs (the "Focus"). The SLR model weighs in at 5.8oz and costs $ 44.95, and the original model (for point and shoots) weighs 1.6 oz and sells for $ 24.95.

Homemade Flash diffuser
On-camera flashes typically produce some pretty horrible results, and not everyone wants to spend money on an external flash (and take the time to perfect using it). I have found two home remedies that work really well:

For popup flashes, use an old film canister (not the black ones obviously, the hazy white ones). Take the lid off, cut a strip out of it from top to bottom, just wide enough so that it fits snugly over your flash, and just slide it in place so that the flash is being fired through the canister. You'll have to play around with the camera settings a little bit to get the exposure to where you want it. If you do not have any old canisters lying about, ask at a photo printing shop if you can have one.

For point and shoot flashes, I use a small piece of tape, regular Scotch Magic Tape (not the totally clear kind). Put one piece over the flash, test and see what you think. If it's still too strong, just put another piece over it. Weight: negligible. Cost: Around $ 2 for the tape.

Collapsible Reflector
It may seem like an unnecessary expense, but these small, lightweight disks are invaluable for adding light to the shaded part of a person or object, both indoors and out. I use the 22 "Photoflex disk in Silver / White for just about everything, but they come in several different colors. your subject holding the reflector (outside of the picture of course) so that it bounces the light from the window into the shook side of their face, and look at the difference. a white piece of cardboard .It works just as well, but it's not as easy to pack in a bag.

Rain Protection
The Shutter Hat is like a raincoat for your camera (SLR) so you do not have to pass up shooting outside just because it's raining or snowing. It's held in place by Velcro and a rubber piece that fits into the flash hot shoe, and covers lenses up to 8 "long. It also has two slits for the strap, so you can still carry it around your neck with the Hat on. It folds up really small, so you can carry it with you and have it on hand all the time in case of a sudden downpour.

For point and shoot cameras, your best bet is to invest in a waterproof case such as Aquapac or DiCAPac. Not only will they protect your camera in the rain, you can also take it snorkeling or diving. 2.7oz, $ 29.95- $ 49.95. For a land-only low cost alternative, use a shower cap or a ziplock bag with a hole cut out for the lens.

Risk Management News

Risk management is the act or practice of controlling risk. Most businesses re very interested in understanding the ways to control risk. This has created a secondary industry focused on mitigating risk and providing management information that allows business to gain from the knowledge of others who are successful in mitigating risk. As a result there are many trade journals dedicated to risk management information and news. In a constantly changing business environment such news is critical to many companies in taking action to prevent future losses.

This process includes identifying and tracking risk areas, developing risk mitigation plans, monitoring risks and performing risk assessments to determine how risks have changed. Depending on the types of risk involved, it can be further split up into operational, credit and market risk management.

Fierce competition and the widening of consumer bases have encouraged companies to take a greater risk. The concept of ‘no risk no gain’ has taken on a new meaning with the introduction of risk management. Modern companies have the confidence to deal with risks head on and are keener on mitigating rather than avoiding risks.

Businesses have learned to involve more business-focused managers than IT security professionals into their risk management goals. Employees, who understand the complexities of business, are capable of contributing a lot towards risk management. Increasing regulatory pressures has forced companies to expand their risk management teams.

Companies are turning to IT and software to better understand, evaluate and manage these various types of risks. According to a recent survey from Forrester Research, 62 percent of CIOs indicated they already had a company-wide initiative focused on enterprise risk and compliance management.

Most risk management software packages are equipped with tools to help manage product design and manufacturing operations. These help in cutting costs and building quality. They provide standard database functions to add and delete risks, as well as specialized functions for prioritizing and retiring project risks. Each risk can have a user-defined risk management plan and a log of historical events. The tools derive cost, schedule, labor and materials estimates by assessing the interaction and impact of product, organizational and even operational variables.

Many companies are turning to a detailed study of latest trends and tools in the market to prepare themselves for sharper risk management in their businesses.